Materialized

Nikoletta Karastathi

architect

London | United Kingdom

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Nikoletta is a practicing architect and a PhD candidate at The Bartlett, UCL with a strong interest in biology, textiles and programmable materials. She is a tutor at UCL, the Bartlett and has previously taught in Newcastle and Edinburgh University.

Bio – Plexis

Bio – Plexis

The wearable examines the relationship between humans and microbiome through home-made knitted bio-textiles. The garment is made out of bio-yarns infused with bioactive marine algae with a scope to nourish the skin and act as a protective shield. It introduces the care and performability of the material by reimaging the way we treat our garments by creating a process that keeps the material alive for a limited time.

ALGAE BIOACTIVE PLEXIS

The wearable examines the relationship between humans and microbiome through home-made knitted bio-textiles. The garment is made out of bio-yarns infused with bioactive marine algae with a scope to nourish the skin and act as a protective shield. It introduces the care and performability of the material by reimaging the way we treat our garments by creating a process of keeping the material alive for a specific duration of time.

It is extruded to a yarn like format in which it could be knitted to various forms. The final output is initially quite soft and pliable, due to its high concentration of water and its pliability it could be adjusted to a set state in which it dries out and becomes rigid. This process allows for complex, flexible and adjustable shapes. Depending on the requirement of the product bio-resin could be added at the set state to add more rigidity. At its initial state, it would be applied to create a speculative garment and at its rigid state, it could be applied for interior use (lighting, candle holders, vases, casters etc) also larger interior architectural installations.

PLEXI_AMR

Humans and microbes co-exist, and the relationship is remarkably complex. Some microbes can be useful for our bodies whilst some others can cause harm. Unmasking the relationship of microbes with their surroundings and other materials is of importance.

This knowledge can help in re-establishing an equilibrium between ourselves and microbes. We speculate that a homemade bio-yarn that includes the right composition of materials can be helpful in protecting humans from external predator microbes. The knitted bio-yarn wearable garment includes of bee-pollen and achai that should protect from infectious bacteria. 

It is also thermochromic and would illustrate colour change as the garment is exposed to antibiotic resistant environments.